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Around The World: India Edition Friday October 23rd

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Come experience an incredible evening of food & drinks as we continue our Around The World  event featuring India on Friday October 3rd. Enjoy gourmet  indian cuisine for one night only! Our regular menu will be available but we will also feature an amazing authentic Indian set menu!

 

Book your reservations today, as these events fill up quickly!

The 9 Popular Ingredients Showing Up in Cocktails Right Now

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From mushrooms and kale to oysters and foie gras, it’s safe to say cocktail ingredients have stretched beyond straight spirits and citrus wedges. Bartenders are finding ways to infuse savory substances (think: duck fat–infused mezcal) and sweet (see: fig jam) into atypical libations. Maybe it’s time you make a checklist.

1. No Shrubs

The Sleight of Hand, made with beet-grapefruit shrub. Image: Posana Restaurant

Typically made with fruit juice, sugar and acid (like vinegar), shrubs in cocktails are nothing new, but inventive flavors are popping up everywhere. Posana Restaurant in Asheville, NC offers the Sleight of Hand made with beet-grapefruit shrub; at The Rooftop at The Vendue in Charleston, Tolerating the Beet features beet-cinnamon-ginger shrub. And at Coppa in Boston, beverage director Brittany Casos came up with the Concord Crush, made with concord grape–rosemary shrub.

2. Meat Lovers’ Delight

Ramen-San’s duck fat–infused rye cocktail. Image: Ramen-San

As savory as a beverage can get, broths and meat are finding their way into cocktails. (We predicted it earlier this year.) At Ramen-San in Chicago, the team found a way to infuse duck fat into Rittenhouse Rye by steeping roasted duck skins in the rye for 72 hours. The result? A Tribe Called Quack Whisky Sour. At Pistola in Los Angeles, find From The Kitchen With Love, a sipping broth cocktail made with lamb consommé and only found on the spot’s secret cocktail menu.

3. Dairy Queens

House-made ricotta provides the whey for this frothy cocktail. Image: Mezzanine

Milk and eggs are one thing but when yogurt and cheese find their way into drinks, it gets interesting. At the Baldwin Bar at Sichuan Garden in Massachusetts, the I Put a Spell On You cocktail is made with Greek yogurt as is Get Her To The Greek, found at Capa Restaurant at the Four Seasons Resort Orlando. The bartender at the Mezzanine at LA Chapter uses whey as a frothing agent instead of egg white in making the Amaretto Sour. The whey is a by-product of the ricotta made in-house and is mixed with a bit of half and half.

4. Up in Smoke

The Smoked Hibiscus Aviation at Cameo. Image: Cameo

At Cameo Bar at Viceroy Santa Monica, bartender Gary Cahill incorporates hibiscus smoke into his version of an aviation (the Smoked Hibiscus Aviation) by smoking hibiscus tea leaves, filtering the smoke into a glass bottle and sealing shut. The cocktail is strained into a glass bottle filled with smoke, shaken and served. The Flaming Ramirez, made and named for bartender David Ramirez, is topped with an ancho chile set on fire before getting dunked in the cocktail. Find it at Ruggles Black in Houston.

5. Health Kicks

Bee pollen is the perfect garnish for this honey cocktail. Image: Public

While green juice mixed with booze is one way of incorporating health into cocktails, we’re now seeing even more out there ingredients. At Public in New York City, Eben Freeman has created Smokey The Bee, which uses bee pollen as a garnish to emphasize the drink’s honey notes. At The Spare Room in Hollywood, beverage director Yael Vengroff utilizes coconut oil in a fat-washed Aylesbury Duck Vodka and incorporates the result into her creations.

6. Better Butter

The Brown Butter Camarena Reposado. Image: Xixa

If Paula Deen taught us anything, it’s that everything is better with butter. Bartenders have taken note and at the Slurping Turtle, a restaurant in Ann Arbor, Michigan, they serve Staring at the Sun, a cocktail made with fig butter. At Xixa in Brooklyn, the Brown Butter Camarena Reposado is made with tequila infused with brown butter and served neat.

7. Saline Solution

House-pickled onions make the Silvertone cocktail. Image: Midnight Rambler

Bartenders are finding new ways to utilize salt in their creations (see pickle salt, coffee salt and worm salt). Some are taking it one step further. Eben Klemm, partner and beverage director at King Bee in New York City, created The Nast, made with soy sauce and at the Midnight Rambler in Dallas, Crazy Water is used in drinks to increase the minerality: The Silvertone is garnished with house-pickled onions for extra bite.

8. Powders, Baby

The Pillow Talk is crafted with toasted milk solids. Image: The Gorbals

Dried and dusted is the way to garnish cocktails these days, and Petrossian in West Hollywood has found a way to do exactly that with caviar. The Caviar-tini is an update on the martini and made with, yes, caviar powder. At Café Clover in New York City, the Harajuku Gimlet incorporates matcha powder into its house-made yuzu cordial and over in Brooklyn at The Gorbals, beverage director Christine Kang has crafted a cocktail featuring toasted milk solids, called Pillow Talk.

9. Everything Else

The Aguacatero is rimmed with worm salt. Image: Tacoteca

In New York City, Davio’s Northern Italian Steakhouse uses snow (yes, really) in its Snowed In Negroni. For obvious flair, the Sparkle Plenty served at the Swizzle Stick Bar in New Orleans is made with house-made gold dust bitters. And at Tacoteca in Los Angeles, the Aguacatero is garnished with chapulines (seasoned and cooked Mexican grasshoppers) and rimmed with worm salt (ground up gusano worms with rock salt and chiles).

Written by: Source: www.Liquor.com

Around The World: France Edition September 4th

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Come experience an incredible evening of food & drinks as we continue our Around The World series as we feature France on Friday September 4th. Leave Edmonton for a night and dine like you are in Paris! Our regular menu will be available but we will also feature an amazing authentic french cuisine set menu which includes Escargot & coquille st jacque along with a few other surprises!

 

Cliff Lede Vineyards, Napa Valley

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Owner Cliff Lede, Vineyard Architect David Abreu and Winemaker Chris Tynan have come together to form an unrivalled team, making the most of this remarkable property.

Completed in 2005, the gravity-flow winery boasts a berry-by-berry sorting system and conical tanks commissioned using a design inspired by the tanks of Château Latour. One tank per vineyard block ensures each lot evolves at its own pace and acres of caves with single-layer barrel storage ensure access to each barrel at all times. No corner has been cut.

The winery produces Sauvignon Blanc and Cabernet Sauvignon. The flagship, Poetry Cabernet Sauvignon, is crafted from the steep hillside portion of the estate. The land, the talent, the tools and the passion: Cliff Lede Vineyards, a notable addition to the Stags Leap District.

ESTATE VINEYARDS

STAGS LEAP DISTRICT

Our sixty acres of vineyards stretch from our valley floor Twin Peaks Ranch to the steep hillside terraces of the Poetry Vineyard.

The valley floor vineyard that encircles our winery is known as the Twin Peaks Ranch. More varied in soil type than our hillside property, we farm small bespoke blocks comprised of a selection of root stocks, clonal selections and varietals. This property forms the backbone of the Cliff Lede Cabernet program.

The steep, southwest-facing hillside portion of the property is known as the Poetry Vineyard. Reaching from the highest elevation of the Stags Leap Appellation down to the valley floor, this is a high exposure site. These blocks boast a gritty combination of shallow soils atop fractured shales with low-yielding old vines of Cabernet Sauvignon.

The History of Spanish Food

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History of Spanish Food

The succession of cultures that one-by-one set foot on the Iberian peninsula have each left a lasting mark on every facet of Spain’s culture: language, music, art, architecture and, of course, food. In fact, many people are surprised to learn just how much of a delicious melting pot Spain really is.

Geography of Spanish Food

The basis of the history of Spanish food of course has to do with its geographical situation. First of all, the country is located on the Iberian peninsula and is therefore almost entirely surrounded by the waters. Naturally, due to this fortunate location, seafood forms one of the pillars of Spain’s gastronomy and categorizes the country as having a Mediterranean diet. The rest of Spain is a diverse terrain made up of mountain ranges, lush pastures, fertile farmgrounds, extensive coastlines and more, which together provide quite the variety of fresh products. For example, Spain’s famous hams are cured high in the mountains, vineyards and olive groves sprawl across expanses of land, and fresh fruits and vegetables hail from throughout the country.

Cultures Throughout the History of Spanish Food

Endless cultures, as they passed through or settled in Spain, have influenced the history of Spanish food. The Phoenicians left their sauces, the Greeks introduced Spain to the wonders of olive oil, and Romans, Carthaginians, and Jews integrated elements of their own cooking into that of Spain. However it was the Moors who, during their centuries of reign, most impacted Spanish gastronomy. They introduced fruits and light seasonings into the Iberian diet, as well as combinations of fruits and nuts with meats and fish. Rice- a genuine staple of Spanish gastronomy- and therefore Spain’s vast array of rice dishes, come straight from the Moors, as does the use of saffron, cinnamon, and nutmeg. As you eat gazpacho on a hot summer day, thank this clearly gastronomically talented Moorish culture, as it too comes straight from them. Conclusion? Ironically enough, the foods we consider to be “typically Spanish” would either not exist or would be extremely different without the intervention of so many cultures into the history of Spanish food.

The Americas’ Impact on the History of Spanish Food

Along with its obvious historical impact, the discovery of the Americas with Christopher Columbus’ famous 1492 voyage resulted in the addition of more important elements to the history of Spanish food. As of 1520, foods from the new lands arrived in Spain and immediately began to integrate themselves into the Spanish diet. Amongst the many products that crossed the Atlantic and arrived on Spanish turf, tomatoes, vanilla, chocolate, various beans, and potatoes – which surprisingly arrived in Spain before arriving in Ireland- are all staples of today’s Spanish kitchen.